JMeck Scope Mounts PPS-43C Picatinny Rail First Impressions Review

| September 5, 2014 | 0 Comments

I really like my PPS-43C SBR. Yes, it’s heavy and the top-folding stock is a little wonky, but it is accurate and fun to shoot. The 7.62x25MM cartridge is easily tamed by the PPS-43C’s mass.

The only real problem I have with the weapon are the iron sights. They leave a lot to be desired. The front post is difficult to pick up in even the best lighting conditions. The rear sight notch is very thin and exacerbates the front site problem.

Sighted fire in near- or total darkness would be very very difficult. The only saving grace is that the front hood is so big I can use it to point shoot at shorter distances, similar to running an AK-pattern weapon.

So, I started poking around for rail solutions so I could mount a red dot scope (RDS) on the PPS. I saw a few folks online who welded a rail section onto the barrel shroud, but it didn’t look particularly great and I don’t know how to weld, especially aluminium to steel.

I found a pre-made rail by JMeck Scope Mounts, and for $45 shipped I was willing to try it.

Here are my first impressions, backed by a magazine-and-a-half shooting session.

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Construction and Installation

The rail piece is nicely made. It is angled; the thinner portion faces towards the rear of the PPS-43C so that the rail will be level.

The rail comes with two bolts and two specially-shaped threaded metal pieces. These pieces are ingeniously designed so that you can anchor the rail to the shroud without removing the shroud.

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The front piece is sort of like an oval. You insert it into a hole in the shroud, rotate it, and then screw the bolt down.

The rear piece is a “C” shaped piece. You have to weasel it underneath the shroud and between the barrel and the shroud. Installing this part was a pain in the ass, but much easier than taking the shroud off.

Per the directions, I did not overtighten the bolts. I did apply blue Loctite and went one half turn past “unf.” In retrospect, this was a bad idea and I should have cranked down on them much more tightly.

Testing

Off we went to an indoor shooting range. We pushed the target to 40 yards in order to zero the Primary Arms MD07 RDS.

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My buddy Tank did most of the sighting in. After we were done zeroing the MD07 we started shooting through the rest of my mags for fun.

“Uh oh,” Krunk said. “You’ve got a problem.”

The rail had come loose, which meant shots were going all over the place. We fired less than 50 rounds before the mounting system gave up the ghost.

We packed the PPS-43C in for the day. I cleaned it and Krunk reapplied the Loctite and tightened the bolts. Proper-tight this time, instructions be dammed.

In taking the photos for this review, I noticed that the rear mounting widget had developed rust from cleaning. Due to shooting corrosive ammunition, I run boiling water through the PPS-43C in order to dissolve the salts in surplus ammunition.

Because of how the attachment pieces are situated it’s impossible to properly dry it out. I did blow some compressed air in there, but it wasn’t enough. Maybe next time I’ll hit it with WD-40.

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It’s difficult to tell, but if you look through the first hole you can see that the attachment piece has a lot of surface rust on it. It’s odd; the piece was finished.

Cautiously Hopeful

I plan on running the PPS-43C during the last rifle class of the season. I hope that the rail mount holds up through the entire class, but I am not optimistic. The 3-magazine drill is going to really test the attachment system. I guess the good thing about it rattling loose is that it will be easy to strip it off during class and run irons.

I’ll post a more in-depth review with some video in a future post.

About the Author:

Short Barrel Shepherd Short Barrel Shepherd is a regular guy and works to make Web sites and mobile apps easier for people to use. He spends his free time attending fight-focused firearm, knife, and combatives training, motorcycling, writing, and playing games. His daily carry is a Glock 19 pistol and an AR15 .300 Blackout pistol in a backpack.
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